Article of the Week

How Dead Cats, Your Siblings, Eighteenth-Century English Clergy, Making Lists, TED Talks, Evolutionary Biology, Susa Young Gates, and My Mom Can Save the World from Being Utterly Wasted
April 15, 2019
Article of the Week
How Dead Cats, Your Siblings, Eighteenth-Century English Clergy, Making Lists, TED Talks, Evolutionary Biology, Susa Young Gates, and My Mom Can Save the World from Being Utterly Wasted
Author Amy Harris

This daily feature is the introduction to a full article by Amy Harris that was published in our newest issue, 58:1. To download the PDF and read the full text of this article, follow the link below.

In this forum address from July 18. 2017, Amy Harris, associate professor of history and family history/genealogy at BYU, examines the concept of genealogical consciousness, which goes beyond mere knowledge or pursuit of personal or group identity. Instead, it requires that we think about strangers in the past, which causes us to think about strangers in the present and strangers in the future and about how our relationships and actions will last beyond death and echo into future strangers’ lives. It demands that we act more compassionately and more Christlike.

To illustrate genealogical consciousness, Harris uses the example of William Dade, a clergyman in eighteenth-century England, who determined that Church of England parish registers should contain more information than they typically did. Dade’s decision did not come from a historical interest in the past so much as a concern for the future, all the more surprising since Dade died childless.