Studies on Selected Sections of the Doctrine and Covenants

Studies on Selected Sections of the Doctrine and Covenants

Author Various Authors

This ebook contains articles from BYU Studies on a variety of topics related to the Doctrine and Covenants. Christopher C. Jones recounts research that has allowed us to identify the person addressed in D&C 39 (James Covel, not James Covill) and again referred to in section 40. Learning that Covel was a Methodist minister, not a Baptist, enabled Jones to learn a great deal about this formerly unknown person. John W. Welch and Trevor Packer examine a newly found manuscript of D&C 65; Steven C. Harper discusses Lazarus, the rich man, and D&C 104:18; David J. Whitaker explains the use of pseudonyms in earlier editions of the D&C; Dean C. Jessee and John W. Welch examine Joseph Smith's letter from Liberty Jail, March 20, 1839; Ronald E. Bartholomew details the textual changes that occurred in the development of D&C 130:22; and George S. Tate considers the vision received by Joseph F. Smith (now D&C 138) in the context of the Great War and the 1918 influenza epidemic.

Contents

"An Examination of the 1829 'Articles of the Church of Christ' in Relation to Section 20 of the Doctrine and Covenants"
Scott H. Faulring

"Mormonism in the Methodist Marketplace: James Covel and the Historical Background of Doctrine and Covenants 39–40"
Christopher C. Jones

"The Newly Found Manuscript of Doctrine and Covenants Section 65"
John W. Welch and Trevor Packer

"The Rich Man, Lazarus, and Doctrine and Covenants 104:18"
Steven C. Harper

"Substituted Names in the Published Revelations of Joseph Smith"
David J. Whittaker

"Revelations in Context: Joseph Smith's Letter from Liberty Jail, March 20, 1839"
Dean C. Jessee and John W. Welch

"The Textual Development of Doctrine and Covenants 130:22 and the Embodiment of the Holy Ghost"
Ronald E. Bartholomew

"'The Great World of the Spirits of the Dead': Death, the Great War, and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic as Context for Doctrine and Covenants 138"
George S. Tate